Helping Kids Succeed! Jim Egerdal and Victor Stoeffler

From Jim Egerdal:

Hi Fellow Readers,

In case you missed it, there was a very interesting piece on NPR Morning Edition today entitled “Why Millions of Kids Can’t Read …” that I think you’ll find interesting.  The story is based on scientific research showing that reading and learning to read is not a natural process learned by doing as is talking.  The big takeaway from the research is that the starting point for learning to read is sound.  To become a reader a child must figure out how the words she hears and knows how to say connect to letters on the page.  Writing is a code we humans have invented to represent speech sounds.  Kids have to crack that code to become readers, to learn the sounds that are represented by the letters.

You can listen to the story here:

https://www.npr.org/2019/01/02/677722959/why-millions-of-kids-cant-read-and-what-better-teaching-can-do-about-it

And for the interested student, the research is available here:

https://www.apmreports.org/story/2018/09/10/hard-words-why-american-kids-arent-being-taught-to-read

From Victor Stoeffler:

On behalf of all the readers at Headstart I also would like to say there is another component in why and how children “learn” to read.  It is mostly in the relationship that the child has with the person who reads to and with them.  I had the opportunity to be the head of an organization which promoted the reading to newborns and babies.  This program was supported by lots of research that said that the voice and the resonance of the reader was very influential in why the child later became a reader and the warmth of the relationship and the closeness was very important in later “learning” how to read.  All the children in in my family are proof of that.  At Headstart the readers are primarily imparting a love of reading and books, that is simply the mission.